Poli-tits

 

Free the Nipple campaign is about equality. It’s about taking your shirt off like a man in a park. It’s about breastfeeding in public and standing up straight as you walk past builders. It’s about strength.

But in the search for equality we’ve become picky. Vogue is littered with cupcake tits, but the taut boobs of Page 3 are banned. Why are middle class boobs allowed out and other boobs kept in? Surely this isn’t freedom at all.

Tits have become political. On one side is the Page 3 model – shiny, erotic and, essentially, working class. She represents powerful female sexuality. She straddles the page and looks you in the eyes and knows her body screams “sex”.

But images of her were too tempting to be on the kitchen table. Too oppressive to sit next to the weather forecast. This wasn’t equality at all – this was fake-tanned, pumped up, throbbing female sexuality. So that was that. End of an era. Banned.

  
The Good, The Bad and The Kruger

 

Then there is the Vogue model. She is high culture, wearing her nipples like fashion accessories. She’s vacant, childlike and holy – sometimes we even give her wings. We’ve taken away all her active sexuality. She can Free the Nipple.

So we’ve ended up with a nudity check-list. Slight, pert, small and hairless. Middle class, young and coy. By reserving nudity for the pages of glossies we restrict the way women are allowed to use their bodies and limit the messages they are allowed to send.

Just as you decide whether to make your hands into hands that lay bricks or write books or paint paintings or type numbers, women should have the freedom to choose what they do with their boobs. They’re allowed to be attached to something sexy. Sometimes.

This revolution is not just about freeing the nipple, it’s about freedom of the nipple.

The point of this campaign is about ownership. The point is that whether your boobs hang low or perch up high, whether they’re Oxford-educated or dropouts, whether they’re young or old, you can swing ’em how you want. 

Words by: Megan Agnew